Reclining With Jesus (Thoughts on Maundy Thursday)

aaron-burden-149692

As we approach the middle of Holy Week, our attention shifts to the last supper. In this iconic scene, we observe the past meeting the present and a glimpse of the future.

On Maundy Thursday as it’s called, we reflect deeply on the pending sacrifice of Christ, the emotions of this night, and what it means to share this meal with Christ today.

Continue reading…

The Power of Little Things

jakob-owens-168406

Over the years, I’ve noticed a trend in Christianity to be known for our kingdom accomplishments. Full disclosure: this is alive and well in my own life too. It’s a human issue, especially when we elevate certain leaders to an almost celebrity status. We communicate “This is the ideal. Be like this.”

But in our pursuits of the big things, it’s easy to miss the power of little things.

In fact, the more time we spend with Jesus, He seems to call us to think differently about accomplishments and instead focus on the things that often go unnoticed.

Continue reading…

Preach the Pauses

bench-889222_1280

One of the things they teach you in seminary is the importance of crafting sermons. A lot of instruction goes into creating biblically sound, articulate, and application heavy messages. Of course, there are certain things about sermons that can’t be taught, but can only be learned.

Continue reading…

Create Movements, Not Resolutions

sunrise
It was G.K. Chesterton who changed my thinking about time and age. I used to think as the years added up and your life ebbed farther away from adolescence it meant you were slowly dying, even though no one wanted to admit it. I viewed life like that creepy hour glass on the Days of Our Lives—it just keeps dropping sand until your out. Chesterton, however, wrote about God having an ‘eternal appetite of infancy,’ that is to say, he doesn’t grow old or tired, but lives each day with the same passion and excitement as when the world was first created. Our Heavenly Father, according to Chesterton, is younger than we are.
Continue reading…