Loving Life In The Rut

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This year has been good, but–and this is a big BUT–it’s also been incredibly difficult and unbelievably challenging. For much of this fall season, we’ve felt like we’re stuck in a rut.

Setbacks, financial struggles, and disappointment. These and more describe what the past few months have been like. In the turmoil, though, we’ve been reminded of something lately–the rut, as tough as it is at times, is life. And life is good. And we’re trying to love it.

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Everything and Nothing

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Used with permission: http://www.freeimages.com/photo/empty-office-1519291

In the gospels Jesus asked this simple, yet haunting question–“What good is it to gain the world, yet lose your soul?” In other words, what if you have it all, but you’re missing what matters most?

Is it possible to be incredibly full and yet painfully empty? Can someone have it all together, and yet, be utterly and irrevocably depleted? Jesus was entreating us to think about our lives and what we’re striving for. He was inviting us to consider what constitutes a meaningful life.

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Camps and youth ministry: a reminder of living now

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Sometimes in the way we talk with young people, we convince them adolescence is a time to survive, a time to move on. We say things like I’ve been there too. Or, Back in High School I went through this. And then of course, the classic You think you have it hard now, well, when I was your age…

Perhaps inadvertently, our language paints adolescents as a season of life to ‘get through’ or ‘survive.’ But God has not created us to merely survive or get from one place to the other. He created us to live fully today. And that includes our teenage years.

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Create Movements, Not Resolutions

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It was G.K. Chesterton who changed my thinking about time and age. I used to think as the years added up and your life ebbed farther away from adolescence it meant you were slowly dying, even though no one wanted to admit it. I viewed life like that creepy hour glass on the Days of Our Lives—it just keeps dropping sand until your out. Chesterton, however, wrote about God having an ‘eternal appetite of infancy,’ that is to say, he doesn’t grow old or tired, but lives each day with the same passion and excitement as when the world was first created. Our Heavenly Father, according to Chesterton, is younger than we are.
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